Tips On How To Buy Irish Jewelry For A Gift

via Tips On How To Buy Irish Jewelry For A Gift.

There is not a doubt that giving your loved one jewelry says they are special. But giving someone of Irish heritage a piece of Irish or Celtic jewelry, steeped in symbolism and tradition could put them over the moon. The sentimentality of Celtic jewelry is phenomenal but finding the perfect meaning is key. It’s a timeless gift, like a family heirloom that can be passed on for generations. However, successfully selecting the perfect piece with that special meaning can be a wee bit confusing for some people. Simply follow these easy tips and choosing that perfect jewelry gift that speaks for itself will be effortless.

1. How old is the person you are shopping for? You really want to take the age of the perstemporary imageon into consideration. If they are a child you’ll want something smaller in size, maybe with a touch of whimsy like an angel or fairy. If they are in their twenties to forties then have no fear and go trendy with an Infinity Knot or Stackable Claddagh Ring. If you are buying for somebody a wee bit wiser in their years then I would go with a traditional symbol of Ireland like an Irish Harp.

2. What type of jewelry do they normally wear? Start looking at how they currently accessorize their wardrobe. Do they wear earrings all the time? Are they long and dangling or are they smaller and close to the ear? Do they like bracelets and rings or are they a necklace person? If you are buying a ring it is important to get the size correct. Many online jewelry retailers offer a ring sizing tool. A simple ring sizing guide to measure your finger or an actual ring online. By using this simple tool it eliminates the hassle of having to make a ring exchange.

3. Is it a religious occasion? Having an understanding of the event or occasion you are purchasing your jewelry gift for is very important. If it is a religious ceremony like a communion or confirmation you should go with something more traditional like a Celtic cross, medal or rosary.

4. On the other hand shopping for a birthday gift can be fun. Take the person’s personality into consideration. Are they fun and vibrant with a great sense of humor? Then go with something whimsical that has a punch of emerald green color like the “Little Irish Devil Shamrock” necklace. If they are a little more mystical and free-spirited try a legendary style like the “Children of Lir” pendant, “Irish Tree of Life” or something with a Celtic knot theme. If they are a bit more reserved then try a more traditional shamrock pendant, trinity knot or a claddagh necklace.

5. Who is the person you are shopping for? If you are shopping for a sibling or close friend who is like a sister then you should consider a style like the “Celtic Sisters Knot”. For a more romantic gift we recommend shopping for a love knot or a claddagh ring, a symbol of friendship, love and loyalty. If you are shopping for a mom or mom to be then consider a style with loads of sentimental meaning like the “Celtic Mother’s Knot” or the “Mother’s Claddagh” collection. Any mother would be overwhelmed with joy by their meaning. If you are purchasing for a grandmother try considering a style like the “Family Birthstone Claddagh”. It can be personalized with all the grand children’s birthstones. What Irish grandmother wouldn’t love that?

Irish and Celtic jewelry is inspired by customs and folklores passed on for generations over centuries from countries like Ireland and Scotland. Giving a piece of jewelry like this as a gift is a wonderful tribute to someone’s heritage.

Jennifer Derrig, Owner of http://www.TheIrishJewelryCompany.com. Shop The Irish Jewelry Company for all your Irish Jewelry needs.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jennifer_Derrig

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Women’s Christmas in Ireland

Have you ever heard of “Women’s Christmas”?
In Ireland on January 6, the Feast of the Epiphany, it is when traditionally the Irish finish celebrating Christmas. It is also known as Nollaigh na mBean in Irish (Women’s Christmas).

Tradition has it that women get the day off and the men of the house get to do the housework, cooking and take down the Christmas decorations. Women meet up have a day out and treat themselves.
Are you celebrating Women’s Christmas this year?

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THE CANDLE IN THE WINDOW

The placing of a lighted candle in the window of a house on Christmas eve is still practiced today. It has a number of purposes but primarily it was an symbol of welcome to Mary and Joseph as they traveled looking for shelter.

The candle also indicchristmas-around-the-world-06ated a safe place for priests to perform mass as, during Penal Times this was not allowed.

A further element of the tradition is that the candle should be lit by the youngest member of the household and only be extinguished by a girl bearing the name ‘Mary’.

An Irish Christmas Tradition… “Wren’s Day”

St. Stephen’s Day, or the Feast of St. Stephen, is a Christian saint’s day to commemorate Saint Stephen, celebrated on 26 December in Ireland.

St. Stephen’s Day (Lá Fhéile Stiofáin), or the Day of the Wren (Lá an Dreoilín), is an occasion to commemorate the life of St Stephen, a Christian martyr. Most people in Ireland today spend the day quietly with close friends or family.

On “Wren’s Day”, in some areas of Ireland like Dingle, groups of musicians, figures dressed in straw suits and followers in fancy dress or st-stephens-day-green-goldparade-dingle-ireland+1152_13326480249-tpfil02aw-19422disguise can be seen moving about the streets and lanes “hunting the wren”.

During Penal Times there was once a plot in a village against the local soldiers. They were surrounded and were about to be ambushed when a group of wrens pecked on their drums and awakened the soldiers. The plot failed and the wren became known as ‘The Devil’s bird’.

On St. Stephens day a procession takes place where a pole with a holly bush is carried from house to house and families dress up in old clothes and with blackened faces. In olden times an actual wren would be killed and placed on top of the pole.
This custom has to a large degree disappeared but the tradition of visiting from house to house on St. Stephens Day has survived and is very much part of Christmas.

This custom has to a large degree disappeared but the tradition of visiting from house to house on St. Stephens Day has survived and is very much part of Christmas.

St. Stephen’s Day is a national holiday in Ireland, but, the celebrations have little connection to the Saint.