Celebrating the Autumn Equinox Called Mabon

The Celtic festival known as Mabon takes place on the Autumn Equinox. Mea’n Fo’mhair is the name that the Druids give to this festival, during which they pay homage to the Green Man, who is considered to be the God of the Forest, by pouring libations for the trees. At this time, it is permissible to make offerings of ciders and wines, as well as herbs and fertilizer. Mabon, like Ostara, is an equinox festival, but unlike Ostara, the emphasis of Mabon is on balance. This is because the vernal equinox is one of the few occasions throughout the year when genuine balance can be seen in nature. Day and night are on par with one another. At Mabon, the chopping down of John Barleycorn is symbolized by the use of three stalks of locally gathered barley that are knotted together with rafia and a little bit of red wool. The folk tale and song known as “The Ritual of John Barleycorn” is meant to symbolize the planting, growth, and final “sacrifice” or harvesting of corn. The story is told in the form of a ritual. Mabon is known as a period when mysteries may be revealed. It is appropriate to pay homage to the Spirit World at this time. It is a time that is considered to be a time of equilibrium, and it is during this time that we take a break, relax, and take pleasure in what we have produced as a result of our individual labors, whether those labors have been directed toward the care of our gardens, our families, or any projects that we have been working on.

After the toil and labor of harvesting, the festival of Mabon ushers in a period of leisure and relaxation. In terms of one’s life path, it is the season of reaping what one has sown; it is the time to look back at the goals and ambitions of Imbolc and Ostara and reflect on how those hopes and aspirations have come to fruition. As we get ready to start our descent, now is the time to wrap up any unfinished business, clean house, and let go of everything that is no longer desired or required so that we may make the most of the quiet and reflective season that winter brings. And now is the moment to sow the seeds of fresh thoughts and dreams, which will remain dormant but be nurtured in the darkness until the coming of spring.

About the Autumn Equinox also known as Mabon

How do you pronounce Mabon?

The word Mabon is pronounced MA-bun with the “a” like in cat. It is a modern word to describe the Fall Equinox

What is the Meaning of Mabon?

The name “Mabon” comes from the sun deity of the same name who was worshiped in the Celtic religion. Mabon, also known as the Fall or Autumn Equinox, is also known as the Festival of Dionysus, the Harvest of First Fruits, and the Wine Harvest.

What is the celebration of Mabon?

The Autumnal Equinox marks the beginning of Mabon, a pagan harvest festival that is held annually around September 21st and continues until September 24th. This celebration, which is also known as Harvest Home, takes place in the midst of the harvest season, at the point in time when the days and nights are of equal duration. Pagans and ancient Celts observed this day as a time to express gratitude to the natural world for a bountiful harvest and to pray to their deities and goddesses for the continuation of the harvest during the colder months.

What exactly is the story of John Barleycorn?

John Barleycorn is a figure that appears in English mythology. He is said to personify the harvest of barley that takes place in the fall. In addition to this, he is symbolic of the magnificent beers and whiskeys that can be produced from barley, as well as the benefits that these beverages have.

What is the term given by the Celts to the Autumn Equinox?

Mabon is the name of the Celtic festival that celebrates the autumn equinox and takes place when the summer heat gives way to the crisp air of autumn. This event is held every year as a part of the traditional Celtic festivals, which trace back to ancient times.

What is the Autumn Equinox?

The autumnal equinox, when the Sun travels south over the celestial equator, occurs on September 21 or September 23 in the Northern Hemisphere. As the Sun crosses the celestial equator heading northward on March 20 or 21, the Southern Hemisphere experiences the equinox. Peasants in Christianized parts of Europe observed the autumn equinox as the Feast of the Archangel Michael throughout the Middle Ages.

When Exactly does the Autumn Equinox take place?

What exactly is the equinox that occurs in autumn? The sun is aligned such that it shines squarely on the equator at the fall equinox, and this ensures that both the northern and southern hemispheres get an equal quantity of sunlight. At exactly 2:21 p.m. on Wednesday, the alignment will take place formally. Regardless of whether or not there are clouds in the sky, Austin will get around 12 hours and 8 minutes of daylight.

Mabon Celtic Mythology

In Celtic mythology, Mabon is the period when, according to folklore, the God of Light was vanquished by the God of Darkness, which resulted in the lengthening of the night. Mabon is the son of Modron, the Great Goddess of the Earth, according to Celtic tradition. After his birth, Mabon was abducted for three days, which caused light to go into hiding. In addition, Mabon represents the masculine character that is associated with the harvest.

Mabon Signs and Symbols

The symbols we identify with Thanksgiving are very similar to those associated with Mabon symbols.

  • Apples: The apple is used to represent the Fruit Harvest as a symbol. In a great number of spiritual practices, the apple plays a crucial role. It is a symbol of healing, rejuvenation, regeneration, and completeness in addition to representing life and immortality. It is said to restore youth, add years to your life, and make you more beautiful. The apple is known in Ogham as “Quert,” which is also the name of a character who exemplifies health and energy. The apple, which represents the origin of life, may be found in the center of the Ogham grove. The pagan belief is that the apple harbors a “secret.” If you cut an apple lengthwise, you will find that it has the shape of a pentagram and contains five seeds. It is a beloved representation of the Pagan religion. As a result, the five points also symbolize the cardinal directions of east, south, west, north, and inside in addition to the elements of earth, air, fire, and water, with spirit at the top of the list.
  • The Cornucopia: Mabon is traditionally represented by the cornucopia, also known as the Horn of Plenty. It is a magnificent sign of the prosperity that harvest brings, and it is a beautifully balanced symbol that has both masculine (phallic) and feminine elements (hollow and receptive).

Colors of Mabon:

The colors of autumn foliage are the ones most often associated with the Mabon Celebration, so this shouldn’t come as much of a surprise.

  • dark green
  • red
  • orange
  • yellow
  • brown
  • gold

The Autumn Equinox and Mabon is a time of celebration as well as leisure after the toil and labor of the harvest. In terms of one’s life path, it is the season of reaping what one has sown; it is the time to look back at the goals and ambitions of Imbolc and Ostara and reflect on how those hopes and aspirations have come to fruition. As we get ready to start our descent, now is the time to wrap up any unfinished business, clean house, and let go of everything that is no longer desired or required so that we may make the most of the quiet and reflective season that winter brings. And now is the moment to sow the seeds of fresh thoughts and dreams, which will remain dormant but be nurtured in the darkness until the coming of spring.

Published by The Irish Jewelry Company

We at The Irish Jewelry Company take pride in making the Irish gift giving experience modern and convenient. The Irish Jewelry Company celebrates their Celtic heritage and a love of Ireland through original Irish Jewelry design. Their beautiful Irish jewelry is steeped in Celtic symbolism and rich in Irish tradition.

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