Irish Proverbs

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Oh the infamous and ever popular Irish proverb. But what  is an Irish proverb exactly? Well in short an Irish proverb is a short saying that offers advice or gives wisdom. It is often in the form of a metaphor where human behavior is compared to the behavior of an animal or a natural item, like a tree or the wind.

Here are a few of our favorite Irish proverbs. we just love these truthful short and pithy Irish sayings.

Traditional Irish Proverbs:

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  • If you don’t know the way walk slowly – Irish Proverb
  • Two thirds of help is to give courage – Irish Proverb
  • The best horse doesn’t always win the race – Irish Proverb
  • It takes time to build castles – Irish Proverb
  • No man is wise at all times – Irish Proverb
  • It’s easy to half the…

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St. Brigid’s Feast Day, February 1st

Ireland’s very own patron saint St. Brigid’s Feast Day is February 1st also as Imbolc.  Imbolc or Imbolg, is a Gaelic festival that traditional marks the start of warmer days and the arrival of spring.  It also the halfway point between the winter solstice and the spring equinox. Saint Brigid of Kildare is Ireland’s most important female saints. Saint Brigid was born Brigit, and shares her name with a Celtic goddess from whom many legends and folk customs are associated.

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Halloween Costume Origins

halloween kidsOn Halloween night children would dress up in scary costumes and go house to house. ‘Help the Halloween Party’ and ‘Trick or Treat’ were the cries to be heard at each door. This tradition of wearing costumes also dates back to Celtic times. On the special night when the living and the dead were at their closest the Celtic Druids would dress up in elaborate costumes to disguise themselves as spirits and devils in case they encountered other devils and spirits during the night. By disguising they hoped that they would be able to avoid being carried away at the end of the night. This explains why witches, goblins and ghosts remain the most popular choices for the costumes.

Valentine’s Day from an Irish Perspective

The Irish Jewelry Company's Blog

Ah, Valentine’s Day. The first thing that comes to mind is a heart-shaped box of cheap chocolates that should be directly applied to one’s hips. And then there is that sweet little cupid. He’s an overweight angel 538317_10152572375170245_1591362128_naiming a bow and arrow at you to inspire you to fall blissfully in love. I mean, let’s face it. Cupid’s arrow is a weapon that literally and metaphorically could be the death of you. But all jokes aside, do you even know why we actually celebrate Valentine’s Day? I didn’t think so.

The Legend of Saint Valentine
In ancient Rome, the date February 14th was a holiday to honor the Roman Goddess of women and marriage. The next day was celebrated as the pagan Roman Feast of Lupercalia. During this time in Roman history, young adults were strictly segregated by sex. No surprise, it was 269 AD. Eventually they needed to give…

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Irish New Years Tradition

The Irish Jewelry Company's Blog

New Year’s Day in Ireland also is known as the Day of the Buttered Bread. It’s called “La na gCeapairi”, Gaelic for “Day of the Buttered Bread” or “Day of the Sandwich”.

Irish tradition says buttered bread placed outside the front door

Baked Breadsymbolizes an absence of hunger in the household, and presumably for the year to come.

Barm Brack (a fruit bread) is baked especially to be smashed against the door by the man of the house, to banish hunger from the land in the new year.

It is also said to chase the bad luck out of a house and to invite good spirits in.

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Irish Christmas Traditions

The Irish Jewelry Company's Blog

irish christmas traditions

Ireland is a magical country, filled with tradition and folklore dating back many years. Christmas in Ireland is an especially magical time of year. Many Irish Christmas traditions have become part of the Christmas celebration of many nationalities and have made their way into main stream American Christmas customs.

In Ireland people say “Nollaig Shona Duit” pronounced NO-Lihg HO-nuh ghwich. This Irish Christmas greeting literally translates to Happy Christmas.

One beloved Irish Christmas tradition is that of the Christmas plum pudding. The traditional Irish Christmas plum pudding has had humble beginnings. Plum pudding was originally a porridge flavored with scraps of leftover meat or fish, thickened with bread crumbs and bound together with eggs, fruit and spices. During the Tudor and Stuart period in England, dried prunes were added to the pudding mixture which became known as a plum porridge. Eventually becoming called plum pudding.

Another very common…

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